Prof. David M. Buss

University of Texas at Austin, US

THE EVOLUTION OF SEXUAL MORALITY

 
Standards of morality are fundamental features of human psychology. They guide people’s individual conduct. They determine the rewards and punishments people impose on others. And they define criteria by which individual reputations rise or fall. No domain of human conduct is more heavily moralized than sexuality and mating. Moralized sexual conduct includes monogamy-polygamy, incest, appropriate age of sexual debut, homosexuality, fidelity-infidelity, mate poaching, sexual exploitation, prostitution, and various forms of sexual treachery. Astonishingly, theories of morality have almost entirely neglected sexual conduct. We present an evolutionary framework that articulates 10 classes of adaptations required to understand different facets of sexual morality. This framework explains sexual double standards, perspectival shifts in sexual morality, and moral hypocrisy. Empirical studies discover strong sex differences in sexual morality, as well as important personality predictors of individual differences in sexual morality. Discussion focuses expanding personality psychology to more fully encompass the moral domain, of which sexual morality is central and an evolutionary perspective indispensable.
 
The chair of the keynote lecture will be Prof. Wojciech Pisula, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
 
The accompanying Invited Symposium will be organized and chaired by Prof. Wojciech Pisula, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
Keynote Lectures

 

Prof. Michael W. Eysenck

Roehampton University, UK

Theoretical approaches to understanding trait anxiety

One major theoretical approach emphasizes the importance of genetic factors and the ways in which such factors impact on physiological functioning. Within this approach, individual differences in the functioning of the cognitive system have sometimes been regarded as epiphenomenal. Such an approach can be contrasted with a more cognitive theoretical approach in which there are important bidirectional influences of cognitive and physiological processes on each other. It is argued that the latter approach is superior to the former.
 
The chairs of the keynote lecture will be Prof. Shulamith Kreitler, Tel-Aviv University, Israel and Prof. Małgorzata Fajkowska, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland

 

The accompanying Invited Symposium will be organized and chaired by Prof. Shulamith Kreitler, Tel-Aviv University, Israel and Prof. Małgorzata Fajkowska, Institute of Psychology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Poland
Keynote Lectures

 

Prof. Dan P. McAdams

Northwestern University, USA

People Differ from Each Other in Three Ways – As Actors, Agents, and Authors

 
Personality concerns the psychological variations on human nature that make the biggest difference for adaptation to social life. Personality psychologists have traditionally conceived of these socially consequential individual differences as dispositional personality traits. As such, traits capture consistent variations in how social actors perform their roles in human groups – dispositional styles or signatures that become, in the eyes of others and the self, fundamental components of the actor’s social reputation. But human beings reveal noteworthy psychological variations in at least two other registers, as well – as motivated agents, who differ markedly from each other in terms of life goals and values; and as autobiographical authors, who construct self-defining narratives to provide their lives with some semblance of continuity and coherence in time. Put simply, stories layer over goals and values, which layer over foundational dispositional traits. The three perspectives on personality – actor, agent, and author – each follow their own respective trajectories or lines of personality development, with traits’ evolving out of infant temperament dispositions, goals and values out of the older child’s theory of mind, and life stories taking form first in adolescence, with the emergence of autobiographical reasoning. Each of the three perspectives on personality, moreover, specifies its own conceptual geography and poses its own unique challenges for measurement.

 

The chair of the keynote lecture will be Prof. Colin DeYoung, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA

 

The accompanying Invited Symposium will be organized and chaired by Prof. Colin DeYoung, Department of Psychology, University of Minnesota, USA
Keynote Lectures

 

Prof. Markus Quirin

Stanford University, USA

 

TOWARDS A SCIENCE OF PERSONAITY DYNAMICS: EXPLAINING HUMAN BEHAVIOR IN THE 21st CENTURY

 

Dynamic systems approaches increasingly gathered the interest of psychologists as neuroscientific and computer-based methodologies have been progressing throughout the last two decades. Adopting such a dynamic approach to conceptualize personality, I propose an agenda of several claims modern personality research should consider to determine core personality functions as a basis to adequately explain human behavior in the 21st century. Although this approach is segregational it should finally be able to explain the aggregational emergence of static, economical personality superfactors and to increase explained variance in predicting individuals’ behavior. Some central claims refer to the consideration of intraindividual variance and motivation of behavior, brain networks functioning, as well as extended usage of experimental methodology and implicit measures. To put forward such an agenda for a „science of personality dynamics”, I present a neurobiologically informed, multi-layer self-regulation model of personality and relevant neurobehavioral research that highlight the importance of emotion regulation abilities as a personality construct that is distinct from trait anxiety.
 
The chair of the keynote lecture will be Dr Agata Wytykowska, Faculty of Psychology, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poland

 

The accompanying Invited Symposium will be organized and chaired by Dr Agata Wytykowska, Faculty of Psychology, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poland
Keynote Lectures